Episode 24 – Tokyo with Ken

Ken from Japan is here to share his stories on Japan!

  • To access this episode please access it on my web host, Buzzsprout
  • To access the Traveltalk podcast from your mobile device, try itunes or Google Play

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Ken’s Recommendations on Japan:

FOOD:

One thing I love about Tokyo is the number of the great restaurants. Sushi, Sukiyaki, Ramen…

Top Restaurant in Tokyo: Yoroniku – The best Japanese BBQ (Yakiniku) in Omotesando area serving the best Japanese beef (Wagyu)!

Although this is BBQ, you don’t need to cock by yourself. Instead, servers will have them cocked perfectly in front of you, and they will propose you the best ways to eat them. Please note that Yoroniku is always very crowded, and you should get the reservation at least 2 weeks before.

 

ACTIVITIES:

I also like walking around Yoyogi and Omotesando area. If you’re tired from walking the busy city, you should go to spacious Meiji Jingu Shrine located right next to the Yoyogi station. This is relatively new shrine built 100 years ago, but you can feel the Japanese traditional Shinto spirits when praying at the main building surrounded by many trees.

Once you have refreshed, you can walk toward Omotesando station, the most fashionable city in Tokyo. You can enjoy shopping in the large shopping mall, Omotesando Hills, as well as tiny local shops in the back allies. This area is also really good for getting some souvenirs for your friends and families.

If you could luckily get the reservation for Yoroniku for your dinner, this is only 10 mins walk from Omotesando station.

 

 

 

Episode 18 – Paris with Amy

Amy is my younger sister who lived in Paris for a year. She learned French and immersed herself into the Parisian lifestyle. Amy used to have a blog called The Moveable Feast, where she highlighted this adventure. She was kind enough to share some additional details below. Please enjoy!

To access this episode please access it on my web host, Buzzsprout

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A bossy, unconventional, probably way too wordy guide to Paris
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I realize that Paris is one of the most romanticized and lusted after cities in the world and that it is completely unoriginal to have “fallen in love” with it. It’s wrapped up in almost as many cliches of love and light as it is of bad rumors of rude waiters and grabby pickpocketers. None of those stereotypes really interest me, but the other stuff—how damn beautiful the city is, how much history there is on every street, how the city cares more about heritage and the right way to do things more than new trends and innovation, the food/art/fashion scenes—yeah, all of that grabs my attention.
(One of my favorite anecdotes of French history is when Henry of Naverre, a lifelong Protestant who had a claim to the French throne in the late 1500’s, chose to give up his religion and accept Roman Catholicism in order to secure himself a place in the Catholically-dominated region of Paris. While his move got him the Crown, we all know he really just wanted to come back home to Paris, as he’s apparently quoted with saying “Paris vaut bien une messe” — “Paris is well worth a mass.”)
So before I leave I thought I’d put together a “guide” (if you could call it that—I’m not really sure how these things are traditionally organized?) to the city, if for no other reason than to try and make sense of what’s all wrapped around in my head before I leave. So here goes—
// RANDOM, IMPORTANT ADVICE //
1. Acquaint yourself with the arrondissements before you go.
Arrondissements = districts of Paris. There are twenty of them, with the lowest numbers starting out in the center of the city and working their way out “like an escargot,” as the French like to say. Check out the map below to get a feeling on them. It’s a really great system, actually, and it makes it handy when getting your bearings. As a general rule, I would say that, with exception of the farther-out 16th and 18th distrcits, the more central arrondissements (1 through 9) are the ones you’ll want to focus your trip around.
And by this I am basically also trying to say: do your research before you go. There are a lot of cool neighborhoods of Paris to see, and some are better than others depending on what you want out of your trip—whether that’s more chic, more romantic, more private, more sight-seeing, whatever. Even more so than that, a lot of the areas flow into each other well and they can make for some really nice, seamless walks (which is better than wandering around from site to site without really getting a feel of the place, I’d say?). I’ve expanded a bit on some of my favorite “must-see” neighborhoods below, but don’t let that be your only source of information.
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2. Don’t go to the Eiffel Tower.
You’ll see the monument from basically everywhere in the city, why waste time getting the ugliest view by going right underneath it? And in any case, the best view is from Trocadero, in the 16th arrondissement. The 16th is great to see anyway because it’s a really clean, really pretty area of Paris (I think this is what people imagine when they say they want to come to “Paris”). It was built later than the rest of the city and is basically now a bourgeoisie residential area, but there are many brasseries and cafes to take a break at too. It’s quieter and more calm than the rest of the city—a nice place to stay at, if that’s the type of thing you’re after. This was my parent’s favorite part of Paris, I think. And it’s a 25 minute walk (a really pretty walk past chic hotels and expensive cars lining the streets) from the Arc de Triomphe.
>>> The big exception to my whole “don’t go to the Eiffel Tower” thing is if it’s the summertime and you’re visiting the 7th arrondissement (métro Ecole Militaire or Motte Piquet). Then I would say it’s a really nice idea to buy a baguette, some cheese, grapes, wine, whatever, and have a picnic out on the Champs-de-Mars, the big park in front of the Eiffel Tower.
3. Skip the Louvre.
Really, I do not understand people’s obsession with this museum. I like it, I guess, but would I wait hours to see the Mona Lisa if I were only seeing Paris (A CITY WHERE THERE IS A LOT MORE COOL STUFF TO SEE) for a few days? You guessed it—no. Just like, pass by the big triangle thing after walking through the Jardins Tuileries before continuing on to Palais Royale or another part of Paris. There are way cooler and more enjoyable museums, if that’s what you’re after. Visit Musée D’Orsay for the best of French art, set in what was once the old train station of Paris right next to the Seine and Assemblée Nationale. This is where you’ll find the greats of Impressionism and the height of French art—Monet, Van Gough, Sisley, Caillebotte, Renoir, etc. Or the Centre Pompidou, in the Marais, if you like modern art from the twentieth century like Picasso, Rothko, Matisse, Braque and Derain. Or go see what exhibitions are showing in the Petit Palais or Grand Palais—beautiful buildings right by Place de la Concorde and the Seine that always have exhibits.
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4. French boulangeries are a must.
I’m guessing if you’re on this blog, you have at least a slight interest in food. You’ve probably heard of the wonders of French boulangeries—and yeah, the hype is real and well-deserved. They’re on every corner, and the standards are pretty impressive. Nine times out of ten the boulangerie will have croissants, baguettes, and pastries that are x10 better than wherever you live back at home. I would just say don’t trek out to specific ones that are hyped up on the internet (Laduree, Angelina’s, etc) just because there are sooo many good ones, and the real best ones are probably names you haven’t heard of (this seems like a good list to me?).
Regarding eating out for regular meals, I’m not going to give specific recommendations but I would say just try walking around certain areas and neighborhoods and browsing the restaurants. There are so, so many in Paris (I’m guessing more than any other city in the world, per square meter), so just find one that you think looks good for your price range. Also, don’t be put off if they give you an English menu or even if the restaurant has an English name—doesn’t have any correlation with how “authentic” the place is or not, in my opinion.
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5. Expect to walk a lot, and to enjoy it.
Paris has, hands down, the best public transport system in the world. The metro system goes everywhere and anywhere in the city, and it runs smoothly. There are also buses but they’re harder to figure out, especially if you’re just visiting. If you’ll have a phone with data on it, I’d suggest downloading the Paris RATP app. That being said, Paris is one of the best cities to walk around in and it’s actually really small—especially the parts worth seeing as a visitor. Depending on where you’re staying and if it’s nice enough weather, I’d always suggest seeing Paris by foot and just walking everywhere. But sometimes it’d be strategic to take the metro out to a specific, central spot (Montmartre, the Arc de Triomphe, the Pere Lechaise Cemetary are all kind of out of the way), and walk around from there. The metro line 1 goes through all the main tourist things, starting on the west side with the Arc de Triomphe, going through the Champs-Elysees, Grand and Petit Palais, all along the Seine and the Jardin Tuileries, Palais Royale, Louvre, the Marais (and within walking distance of the Ile-de-Cite and Latin Quarter), and then the Bastille. But it is also the line that runs along the Seine, and it’s much more fun to at least walk along part of it rather zipping by underneath it underground. So yeah—if you can walk it, do it. It’s honestly my favorite way to enjoy Paris when it’s nice out.
In terms of figuring out where to stay in your time in Paris, I’d recommend the areas around Opéra and the 8th, or the Latin Quarter, Les Invalides, or the Marais. Anywhere central is really the best, but of course if you’re young and on a budget get anywhere where the hostels are cheap and figure out the metro system for yourself.
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6. In the end, ignore the advice and do what will make you happiest.
I was going to expand on all the bossiness by making other rules, such as: 1) don’t even think of putting a lock on the pont des arts because it is stupid and useless and so cliché even by paris standards, or 2) don’t even think of standing in line at the famed Angelina’s unless you want to hang out with other American tourists while in line only to end up paying 8 euros for mediocre hot chocolate that isn’t as good as the kind I used to get in Seattle, or 3) the Champs-Elysées is a worthless and exhausting visit and if you really want the feeling of true Parisian luxury in window shopping head over to Rue Saint Honoré or Place Vendôme, or 4) please don’t go to Cafe Flore or Les Deux Magots because really, why do you want to pay more-than-average for less-than-average French food, especially when no one even really knows why the cafes are famous in the first place … BUT then I realized, you are not me, I am not you, so I should really try something new and not be so confidently self-righteous. I wrote out this guide as an attempt to help out people (anyone? really, no joke, is anyone even reading this) by giving an biased opinion of what’s worth one’s time and not in Paris—a city that I believe to be the best in terms of leisurely time and things-to-do. I’m proud of Paris, and want everyone to enjoy and appreciate it. But I’m not going to kid myself—one of the great things about this city is that it is perhaps the most commonly shared experience when it comes to travelling. It lives up to its clichés, perhaps more than any other city, in both good and bad ways. And to be possessive over these clichés and this city, as a foreigner living here temporarly for one year, would be ridiculous. So if it will make you happy to go home and said you had “the best,” “to-die for” croissants at “the most chic” cafe called Angelinas, go for it. This is your trip, experience Paris the way you want, and the way that makes it most worthwhile for you.
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// PARIS BY NEIGHBORHOOD //
>>> Paris is kind of incredibly organized (thanks to some top-down, painful re-doing and urban planning of the city done by good old Napolean III and Haussman back in the 1800s). If you were to cut it into four pieces from north-south and west-east, you can get pretty distinct personalities. I would say, in general, the part south of the Seine (latin quarter, invalides, st germain) is the intellectual, more “old-school” part of Paris. The northwest chunk (opera, champs elysées, passy) is the richest, cleanest, most chic, and most business-like. The northeast chunk (top part of the marais, republique, oberkampf, up to bastille and parc buttes-chaumont) is younger, poorer, more hipster. As a young person who lives here, this is where I spend a lot of my time, both during the day and going out at night. If you’re young and travelling with other young people you might like this area a lot, but in general as a tourist who wants to see “Paris,” I’m not sure if it’s that intriguing. And, of course, the entire really central part of the city is touristy, but justifiably so (um, everything that makes Paris famous is there). <<<
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The Marais (III & IV)
A very central, very old part of Paris. It’s home to the Jewish quarter (and the famed L’As du Falafel) and it’s really the most contemporary part of Paris—if you’re wondering where to find fro-yo or a gluten-free shop in the city of gluten-loving bread fiends, go to the Marais. It also has a lot of great boutiques, cafes, bars, the typical kind of stuff you want to come to Paris for. I’d say get off at Metro Saint Paul and walk in almost any direction. There’s the Musée Pompidou right near the Hotel de Ville, and if you keep walking up north you’ll hit the République area and the 10th arrondissement which leads into the Canal Saint-Martin area—a really cool, very young and very hipster area of Paris that is top on a nice day in the spring or summer. Otherwise, you can walk south from the Marais and onto the Île-de-Cite (that has Notre Dame and the Palais de la Justice) and then continue on to the other side to get to the Latin Quarter, or you can walk West from the Marais to get into the central part with the Louvre, Palais Royale, all of that.
The Latin Quarter (V)
A must if you are visiting Paris. It is touristy, always, but for good reason. It’s one of the oldest parts of the city, and that is reflected in the buildings—many boulevards and buiimage (9)ldings are still pretty and follow typical Parisian architecture, but you’ll find more winding, irrational alleys and mismatched housing in the Latin Quarter. I would along Boulevard Saint Michel and past the Sorbonne, turn in to see the Panthéon, and the continue to walk on behind it and a little more north to find a really great area with uncrowded and very typical cafes shops. This is a good place to wander (almost all of Paris is, but especially here).
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Opéra — Madeleine — Concorde (VIII, IX, II) 
The prettiest, most typically Parisian part of Paris. I would recommend staying in a hotel or airbnb in this area, if you can—it’s a central location that is within walking distance of the best and most unmissable monuments. If you walk down from the Opéra, you hit the Madeleine (a huge church modeled after ancient rome) and then, right after, the Place de la Concorde (the place where Marie Antoinette’s head was chopped off, along with tens of thousands of others). Coming to the Place de la Concorde, you can see the Champs-Elysées and Petit and Grand Palais to your right, the Seine and Assemblée National straight across, and then the entrance to the Jardin Tuileries, Palais Royale and the Louvre to your left. I would recommend walking through Rue Saint Honoré and walking past Place Vendôme, which to me is Parisian luxe and elegance at its height, with chic, high-end stores lining the street. Rue Etienne Marcel is another great one, which just feels extremely Parisian old-school with nice shops, cafes, and brasseries all along the street. If you ever find yourself on this street, you must turn down Rue Montorgueil/Rue des Petits Carreaux because it has everything good (cafes, fromageries, chocolatiers) all packed into one walking street. All of this is very close to all the “essentials”—keep walking until you hit the Louvre area and then you’ll have the Île-de-Cite and Notre Dame on your right and the entrance of Le Marais straight in front and to your left
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St. Germain (VI) 
The once-upon-a-time land of Hemingway and intellectual hang-out cafes, now currently the land of chic French designer shopping and over-priced cafes. I love this area, though, and it still has an incredible charm to it. This is where you can find the infamous Le Bon Marche  (the most luxe and oldest department store in Paris) and Le Grand Epicierie. I recommend taking a tour through the district, starting near the Place Saint Sulpice, moving on to window shop chic French boutiques, then stopping at a terrace for an expresso before heading south into the Jardin Luxembourg and then out east into the Latin Quarter. Or, walk up to the Seine along Quai Voltaire and walk west until you hit Musee D’Orsay (if it’s nice out, there’s not much better you can do than walk along the Seine, especially on the south bank or the “rive guache“).
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Invalides – La Tour Eiffel (VII)
I really like this area, although I’m not often here. But as a tourist, I think it’d be a really important part to go to, especially during the summertime. There’s Musee D’Orsay, and if you walk a bit left along the Seine, you’ll get to Les Invalides—which has Napolean’s tomb as well as a wicked sweet history museum on World War I & II. Crazy good, but I also like history a lot. Walk down south until you hit Ecole Militaire, which is opposite of the big park in front of the Eiffel Tower, the Champs-de-Mars. This is a really old-school part of Paris, both historically and in practice. Things feel like the Paris cliche here, but in the best possible way. Rue Cler is filled with fruit stands, cafes, boulangeries, fromageries, everything great. There’s also Rue Saint Dominique which has a lot of great, classic French restaurants, including ones by the famous Chrisitan Constant (Cafe Constant, Les Cocottes, Maison Constant).
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Montmartre (XVIII)
Land of Amélie and the most cliched place of all the cliches of Paris! But really, it’s great and worth a trip. I don’t even feel like there is much I can direct you to in this area, because it’s all pretty good and touristy (and I mean the term touristy in the best way possible). Head up to the Sacre Cœur, walk around the winding, hilly roads and check out art and typical cafes. Rue des Abbesses, to the left of the Sacre Coeur, is a nice street with boutiques, traiteurs, and cafes to walk on.
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// OTHER RESOURCES //
> David Lebovitz – I mean, duh. For practical guide stuff and important information, restaurant/bar/cafe recommendations and reviews, and ummm everything else you could possiby need.
> Paris By Mouth – For restaurant recommendations and ideas.
> This New York Times article from 2006 about Parisian libraries makes me really happy. Whether you want to actually visit Paris’ really cool libraries and bookstores or not, it’s just a fun read and will probably make you happy in your decision to visit Paris.
> Cool list from a French journal about different ideas for how to spend 10 euros on a meal (or snack) around Paris. It’s in French, but c’mon, we have technology now so just zip the thing through google translate.
> The Hip Paris blog is a good resource for pretty much everything involving Paris, and it usually does a pretty good job of updating events and things to check out during the specific time you’ll be in the city.
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Episode 22 – The Canadian Mountains with Alicia

Come explore the beautiful mountainous terrain of Squamish, British Columbia with our guest Alicia! She shares her experiences and recommendations about the exhilarating mountain town and how to navigate the vast array of outdoor activities to indulge in!

  • To access this episode please access it on my web host, Buzzsprout
  • To access the Traveltalk podcast from your mobile device, try itunes or Google Play

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Alicia grew up on the west coast of BC in Vancouver, Canada. Living in Vancouver and surrounded by a bunch of fit and adventurous people, she became obsessed with mountains, and the adventures they inspire.

Following her dream to live in a mountain town, Alicia followed her passion and moved to the ocean-meets-mountain town of Squamish, BC in 2016. The town, crammed between Vancouver and Whistler, is famous for a giant granite mountain that makes it look like a Canadian, coastal Yosemite. A good example of a “typical Squamish weekend” is like the one Alicia hosted when Melissa visited in June 2018:

Friday evening: Hike nearly 3,000 feet to the top of a local mountain to have craft beer, and fries, overlooking the ocean and snowcapped mountains. Save the legs, take the gondola down.

Saturday: Find yourself terrified but exhilarated as, surprise! You’re rock climbing vertical granite walls, right beside an epic mountain called The Chief. There’s probably a festival happening downtown but you’re in your own world of adrenaline.

 

Sunday: Canoe across a wild river to access a provincial park, and hike another 3,000 feet, following beside a giant waterfall, to a hidden mountain lake. Feel excited at the end of the day as someone in the group sees two giant bears playing right near your canoe. Pay a local to boat you back across the river so you don’t have to figure out the treacherous crossing with the canoe. Cap it all off by consuming giant bowls of amazing Indian food.

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You can follow Alicia on her blog at https://notrunningforgold.com/ or on Instagram, @funtimes.woodside.

To access Episode 22, please access it on my web host, Buzzsprout

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Thank you!

Episode 17 – Germany with Nadja

Germany (Bavaria!) with Nadja:

Finding your speed limit

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Not to disappoint, but despite the title my story is not going to be a catalog of different speed limit requirements for the German Autobahn (wait…what speed limit?). Instead, what I am going to talk about is how you can explore Germany at your own pace and in your own style – in other words how to explore Germany at your own speed limit.

My name is Nadja. It’s not a very Bavarian name, and sometimes hard to pronounce correctly for people in San Francisco (it’s ‘Nadia’, not ‘Nad Jha’), which is where I have been living and working since 2015.

Before I left Germany (Bavari!)*, almost 7 years ago, the radius of my whereabouts rarely left the 70km (43m) around Munich, which is exactly the distance to my home village called Kochel am See. 70km is also the same distance from the small 4000 inhabitants village to the Austrian border. So we are talking about the very South of Germany where the Alps start, and where finding a good internet connection is patchy.  

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This is where we start, slowly, at a pace of 10m/h…

Kochel am See is located right at lake Kochelsee (as its name says, as See=lake) and close to lake Walchensee, one of the deepest and largest Alpine lakes in Germany. The area offers plenty of outdoor activities, such as e.g. hiking, mountaineering, windsurfing, biking, fishing, rafting, or ice climbing to only name a few.   

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There is plenty to do and to see for the non-sports-enthusiasts as well, e.g. paying a visit to the Franz Marc Museum (exhibiting local expressionistic art), feeling like a king by listening to a classic concert at Herrenchiemsee castle on an island in a lake, or just relaxing in the thermal bath overlooking lake Kochelsee.

Local specialities directly from a farm or produced in-house are very typical, and not always as unhealthy as people claim German cuisine to be.

My tip: Find a nice spot close to a lake or on top of a hill and indulge yourself w/ a Brotzeit (=a light meal) and cold beer, watching the sunset over the mountains and lake.

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The selection of these several Bavarian locales as examples of slow paced living are of course very subjective, because I am one of those proud Bavarians* myself. Indeed, there are plenty of other  relaxing places across Germany worth seeing as well, e.g. the beautiful North Sea Coast, or the idyllic island Sylt.

 

Increasing speed to 40m/h…

Now let’s take things up a notch and look at Oktoberfest. The first association people often have with Bavaria is the Oktoberfest, drawing millions of people every year to Munich in September (fun fact: The Oktoberfest only extends a few days into October; most of the event is actually in September).

Personally, I think there are better, smaller events on the countryside, like the Tegernseer Waldfest, but these events are highly dependent on the time of year and the specific town you’re visiting. So if you don’t want to go up to the speed of Oktoberfest immediately, but you still crave a bit more traditional action or music, then ask a local for recommendations on smaller events to visit.

On the other hand, if your mind is absolutely set on Oktoberfest, and you plan to go w/ a bigger group of people, make sure you book a table around March/April to ensure you can snag one of the highly coveted beer tents.

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Personal impressions from Oktoberfest, incl. the traditional gingerbread hearts you can buy, and my favorite sweet treat Kaiserschmarrn

Even without the thrills of Oktoberfest, Munich definitely offers a faster pace of life, but also provides ample opportunities to take a break, breathe, and just be. The Englischer Garten park in the center of the city offers plenty of space to enjoy the summer sun, sit in a nice beer garden, or even surf on the river Isar (not kidding). The nightlife in Munich is decent, and even offers some good EDM or live music. Take a disco nap and head to the clubs at midnight (there is rarely a crowd before then).  

Tip: If you have limited time, but want to see what the city is like, walk up the stairs to Peterskirche; it costs you less than $5 but rewards you with a great view of the whole city.

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Changing to the fast lane…

If you are looking for high-speed I would definitely also recommend bigger cities such as Hamburg or the capital Berlin, with its endless supply of entertainment possibilities. Hamburg’s Reeperbahn is world famous for its entertainment value as a harbour city (just be aware in which street you walk in, as it also doubles as Europe’s second most famous red light district), and you can make the day a night (or several days one night) in Berlin.

These cities aren’t purely party cities either; there is a lot of history to learn from (e.g. Checkpoint Charlie), culture to see and listen to (e.g. musicals in Hamburg, the Berlin Philharmonic), and lovely recreational areas to walk around in (e.g. Hamburg’s Alster).   

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\When to go to Germany – Summer or Winter?

My biased self would say go twice and experience the country during both seasons (ideally all four seasons!). But if you have to choose, and aren’t the biggest winter sports fan, I would say that summer and autumn offer you more opportunities to get in touch with locals and enjoy the broad variety of events and activities – although you may miss out on some damn good Glühwein (aka mulled wine)!

 

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*When asking Bavarians if they are from Germany, you will likely always end up hearing the critical addition of ‘Bavaria’ in their response; deeply proud, self-evidently confident, and almost surprised why you didn’t ask for Bavaria right away.

 

Where to eat in and around Kochel am See (pescetarian friendly) – Maps

Lunch/Dinner Cake/Brunch/Snacks
  • La Pineta (family Friends, great Italian cuisine)

 

Where to eat in and around Munich (pescetarian friendly, reservation recommended) – Maps

Lunch/Dinner Cake/Brunch/Snacks
  • Call Soul (Distill their own gin, have really good modern local dishes and cocktails)
  • Faun (Bavarian cuisine)
  • Spicery (really good Thai food and cocktails in Munich)
  • Go to Viktualienmarkt and just snack at the stands

 

Where to go out in Munich (personal preferences)

 

Bars Clubs
  • The High (Hip hop beats, same owner as Zephyr Bar)
  • Blitz Club (EDM and apparently one of the best sound systems)
  • Lola Bar (Living room feeling, not really for dancing though)
  • Bob Beaman (also EDM, you see my personal preference)

Under no circumstances go to P1 or Heart Club in Munich if you are a decent human being and don’t need a fake sense of ‘prestige’.

What to do around Kochel and Munich

Outdoors Indoors
  • Mountaineering to

– Herzogstand (has a cable car up and down as well)

– Jochberg (view of 2 lakes)

– Zugspitze (has a cable car, $$$ though)

  • A concert at Herrenchiemsee castle (program), needs a car
  • A boat tour on

–  Kochelsee, also offers small rentals

Staffelsee

  • Partnach Gorge – super exciting, don’t do when rain, needs a car
  • Look/ask for local outside events when booking a stay!

 

Where to stay in and around Kochel am See

At my parent’s B&B or at my sister’s hostel 😉

 

Contact: bissinger.nadja@gmail.com

Link to Picture Folder

Episode 16 – Rwanda with Steven

Rwanda is a beautiful country in Africa with a controversial past, but through this history it’s blossomed into an incredible place to visit if you’re looking for either a relaxing or adventure trip that’s off the beaten path.

Please tune in as we explore this country with Steven, a peace corp volunteer who was stationed in Rwanda for two years. You can check out his blog about his adventures here.

Listen to the podcast here:

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Episode 15 – Shanghai with Shiyin

  • To access Episode 15 please access it on my web host, Buzzsprout
  • To access the Traveltalk podcast from your mobile device, try itunes or Google Play

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Shiyin’s recommendations in Shanghai:
Must-eat Foods
Soup dumplings at Jia Jia Tang Bao
Fried soup dumplings at Yangs Dumpling (many locations)
Braised pork belly (Hong Shao Rou) at Jing Cai Xuan (inside the Reel mall)
Mapo Tofu at Oriental House (inside the Kerry Center mall)
Pork bao (Rou Bao) or veggie bao (Cai Bao) at Babi Mantou (they’re everywhere, just walk around)
Hot Pot at Hai Di Lao (multiple locations)
Sights and Activities
The Bund – very crowded riverside walk full of colonial age buildings and ultra-modern Shanghai development, touristy but worth seeing
Yu Garden, City God Temple, and 16 Pu (Shi Liu Pu) – very walkable area to see old and new Shanghai, tons of tiny shops and food stalls
French Concession – the expat part of town, great for brunch, coffee, and nightlife. The area directly north of the Shanghai Library is pretty.
M50 – contemporary gallery district featuring scultures and Chinese and international art
Going Out
Speak Low – excellent cocktails and fun speakeasy entrance
Unico – Shanghai is not a great music city but this venue usually has solid music and dancing
Chair Club (555 Haifang Lu) – good jazz club; be sure to use the address here since searches in English can produce the wrong address
Great City Views
VUE Bar – the only 360 riverside view in Shanghai; make a reservation and it comes with one drink
Kartel Wine Bar

 

 

Episode 14 – Japan with Ken

Ken from Japan is here to share his stories on Japan!

  • To access Episode 14 please access it on my web host, Buzzsprout
  • To access the Traveltalk podcast from your mobile device, try itunes or Google Play

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Ken’s Recommendations on Japan:

FOOD:

One thing I love about Tokyo is the number of the great restaurants. Sushi, Sukiyaki, Ramen…

Top Restaurant in Tokyo: Yoroniku – The best Japanese BBQ (Yakiniku) in Omotesando area serving the best Japanese beef (Wagyu)!

Although this is BBQ, you don’t need to cock by yourself. Instead, servers will have them cocked perfectly in front of you, and they will propose you the best ways to eat them. Please note that Yoroniku is always very crowded, and you should get the reservation at least 2 weeks before.

 

ACTIVITIES:

I also like walking around Yoyogi and Omotesando area. If you’re tired from walking the busy city, you should go to spacious Meiji Jingu Shrine located right next to the Yoyogi station. This is relatively new shrine built 100 years ago, but you can feel the Japanese traditional Shinto spirits when praying at the main building surrounded by many trees.

Once you have refreshed, you can walk toward Omotesando station, the most fashionable city in Tokyo. You can enjoy shopping in the large shopping mall, Omotesando Hills, as well as tiny local shops in the back allies. This area is also really good for getting some souvenirs for your friends and families.

If you could luckily get the reservation for Yoroniku for your dinner, this is only 10 mins walk from Omotesando station.